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dc.contributor.authorBarratt, S. L.
dc.contributor.authorCreamer, A. W.
dc.contributor.authorAdamali, H. I.
dc.contributor.authorDuckworth, A.
dc.contributor.authorFallon, J.
dc.contributor.authorFidan, S.
dc.contributor.authorNancarrow, T.
dc.contributor.authorWollerton, R.
dc.contributor.authorSteward, M.
dc.contributor.authorGooptu, B.
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, M.
dc.contributor.authorWoodhead, F. A.
dc.contributor.authorScotton, C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-15T14:25:48Z
dc.date.available2021-12-15T14:25:48Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-01
dc.identifier.citationBMJ Open Respir Res. 2021 Nov;8(1):e001063. doi: 10.1136/bmjresp-2021-001063.
dc.identifier.pmid34794958
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjresp-2021-001063
dc.identifier.urihttps://rde.dspace-express.com/handle/11287/622329
dc.description.abstractThe factors determining disease course and survival in fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (fHP) have not been fully elucidated.The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients with fHP in a real-world cohort and investigate factors associated with worse outcomes. We aimed to explore the use of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and peripheral blood monocyte levels in predicting mortality. METHODS: A retrospective, multicentre, observational UK cohort study. RESULTS: Patients with fHP were significantly younger than those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (median age fHP 73 vs IPF 75 years) and were much more likely to be woman (fHP 61% vs IPF 26%). In almost half of all fHP cases (49%, n=104/211), no causative antigen was identified from either the history or specific antigen testing. Overall, fHP was associated with a better survival than IPF, although median survival of both groups was poor (fHP 62 months vs IPF 52 months).IPF survival in patients with a high NLR was significantly lower than those with a low NLR (44 vs 83 months). A monocyte count ≥0.95 K/uL also predicted significantly poorer outcomes for patients with IPF compared with <0.95 K/uL (33 vs 57 months). In contrast, NLR and monocyte count did not predict survival in the fHP cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Although fHP has a statistically lower mortality than IPF, absolute survival time of both conditions is poor. High baseline NLR and absolute monocyte counts predict worse survival in IPF but not in fHP, highlighting the potential for divergence in their pathogenic mechanisms.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherBMJ
dc.rights© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.subjectinterstitial fibrosis
dc.subjectlymphocyte biology
dc.subjectconsultancy work.
dc.titleUse of peripheral neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and peripheral monocyte levels to predict survival in fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (fHP): a multicentre retrospective cohort study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.journalBMJ open respiratory research
dc.description.noteThe article is available via Open Access. Click on the 'Additional link' above to access the full-text.
dc.type.versionppublish
dc.description.admin-notePublished version, accepted version, submitted version
dc.date.epub2021-11-20
dc.citation.volume8
dc.citation.issue1


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© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.