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dc.contributor.authorBallard, Clive
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-08T13:44:31Z
dc.date.available2021-06-08T13:44:31Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-18
dc.identifier.citationOwens AP et al. Implementing Remote Memory Clinics to Enhance Clinical Care During and After COVID-19. Front Psychiatry. 2020 Sep 18;11:579934.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid33061927
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyt.2020.579934
dc.identifier.urihttps://rde.dspace-express.com/handle/11287/621754
dc.description.abstractSocial isolation is likely to be recommended for older adults due to COVID-19, with ongoing reduced clinical contact suggested for this population. This has increased the need for remote memory clinics, we therefore review the literature, current practices and guidelines on organizing such remote memory clinics, focusing on assessment of cognition, function and other relevant measurements, proposing a novel pathway based on three levels of complexity: simple telephone or video-based interviews and testing using available tests (Level 1), digitized and validated methods based on standard pen-and-paper tests and scales (Level 2), and finally fully digitized cognitive batteries and remote measurement technologies (RMTs, Level 3). Pros and cons of these strategies are discussed. Remotely collected data negates the need for frail patients or carers to commute to clinic and offers valuable insights into progression over time, as well as treatment responses to therapeutic interventions, providing a more realistic and contextualized environment for data-collection. Notwithstanding several challenges related to internet access, computer skills, limited evidence base and regulatory and data protection issues, digital biomarkers collected remotely have significant potential for diagnosis and symptom management in older adults and we propose a framework and pathway for how technologies can be implemented to support remote memory clinics. These platforms are also well-placed for administration of digital cognitive training and other interventions. The individual, societal and public/private costs of COVID-19 are high and will continue to rise for some time but the challenges the pandemic has placed on memory services also provides an opportunity to embrace novel approaches. Remote memory clinics' financial, logistical, clinical and practical benefits have been highlighted by COVID-19, supporting their use to not only be maintained when social distancing legislation is lifted but to be devoted extra resources and attention to fully potentiate this valuable arm of clinical assessment and care.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2020.579934en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Owens, Ballard, Beigi, Kalafatis, Brooker, Lavelle, Brønnick, Sauer, Boddington, Velayudhan and Aarsland. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these termsen_US
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectcognitive impairmenten_US
dc.subjectdementiaen_US
dc.subjectgeriatric psychiatry and agingen_US
dc.subjectneuropsychological assessmenten_US
dc.subjectremote measurement technologiesen_US
dc.subjecttelemedicineen_US
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Eldery care.en_US
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Communicable diseasesen_US
dc.titleImplementing Remote Memory Clinics to Enhance Clinical Care During and After COVID-19en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Psychiatryen_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7530252
dc.description.noteThis article is available to RD&E staff via NHS OpenAthens. Click on the Publisher URL, and log in with NHS OpenAthens if prompted.en_US
dc.description.fundingThis paper represents independent research partly funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College Londonen_US
dc.type.versionPublisheden_US
dc.description.admin-notepublished version, accepted version, submitted versionen_US


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Copyright © 2020 Owens, Ballard, Beigi, Kalafatis, Brooker, Lavelle, Brønnick, Sauer, Boddington, Velayudhan and Aarsland. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is
permitted which does not comply with these terms
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2020 Owens, Ballard, Beigi, Kalafatis, Brooker, Lavelle, Brønnick, Sauer, Boddington, Velayudhan and Aarsland. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms