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dc.contributor.authorKos, K.
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Mark
dc.contributor.authorGimbuta, Chloe
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-08T13:58:52Z
dc.date.available2020-09-08T13:58:52Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-08
dc.identifier.citationKhan SS et al. Making connections: Social identification with new treatment groups for lifestyle management of severe obesity [published online ahead of print, 2020 Apr 8]. Clin Psychol Psychother. 2020;10.1002/cpp.2454. doi:10.1002/cpp.2454en_US
dc.identifier.pmid32267579
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cpp.2454
dc.identifier.urihttps://rde.dspace-express.com/handle/11287/621419
dc.description.abstractGroups are regularly used to deliver healthcare services, including the management of obesity, and there is growing evidence that patients' experiences of such groups fundamentally shape treatment effects. This study investigated factors related to patients' shared social identity formed within the context of a treatment group for the management of severe obesity. A cross-sectional survey was administered to patients registered with a UK medical obesity service and enrolled on a group-based education and support programme. Patients (N = 78; MBMI = 48 on entry to the service) completed measures of group demographics (e.g., group membership continuity) and psychosocial variables (e.g., past experiences of weight discrimination) and reported their social identification with the treatment group. The results showed that patients identified with the treatment group to the extent that there was continuity in membership across the programme and they perceived themselves more centrally in terms of their weight status. Weight centrality was negatively associated with external social support and positively associated with experiences of weight discrimination. Group continuity was positively correlated with session attendance frequency. Patients presenting to clinical treatment services with severe obesity often do so after sustained weight loss failure and exposure to negative societal experiences. This study highlights that providing a treatment environment wherein these experiences can be shared with other patients may provide common ground for development of a new, positive social identity that can structure programme engagement and progression.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.2454en_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2020 The Authorsen_US
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectgroup membershipen_US
dc.subjectgroup-based health interventionsen_US
dc.subjectsevere obesityen_US
dc.subjectsocial identityen_US
dc.titleMaking connections: Social identification with new treatment groups for lifestyle management of severe obesityen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journalClinical Psychology & Psychotherapyen_US
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Publisher URL to access it via the publisher's site.en_US
dc.description.fundingThis research was supported by a grant from Leverhulme Trust (RPG-368) awarded to Mark Tarrant, Claire Farrow, Katarina Kos and MarkDaly and also by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care ofthe South West Peninsula (PenCLAHRC).en_US
dc.type.versionIn press (epub ahead of print)en_US
dc.description.admin-notepublished version, accepted version (12 month embargo), submitted versionen_US


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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any
medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
© 2020 The Authors
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2020 The Authors