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dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Nicholas A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-13T10:43:09Z
dc.date.available2020-01-13T10:43:09Z
dc.date.issued2019-12
dc.identifier.citationLamb CA [et al]. British Society of Gastroenterology consensus guidelines on the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults. Gut. 2019 Dec;68(Suppl 3):s1-s106en_US
dc.identifier.pmid31562236
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/gutjnl-2019-318484
dc.identifier.urihttps://rde.dspace-express.com/handle/11287/621184
dc.description.abstractUlcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the principal forms of inflammatory bowel disease. Both represent chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, which displays heterogeneity in inflammatory and symptomatic burden between patients and within individuals over time. Optimal management relies on understanding and tailoring evidence-based interventions by clinicians in partnership with patients. This guideline for management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults over 16 years of age was developed by Stakeholders representing UK physicians (British Society of Gastroenterology), surgeons (Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland), specialist nurses (Royal College of Nursing), paediatricians (British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition), dietitians (British Dietetic Association), radiologists (British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology), general practitioners (Primary Care Society for Gastroenterology) and patients (Crohn's and Colitis UK). A systematic review of 88 247 publications and a Delphi consensus process involving 81 multidisciplinary clinicians and patients was undertaken to develop 168 evidence- and expert opinion-based recommendations for pharmacological, non-pharmacological and surgical interventions, as well as optimal service delivery in the management of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Comprehensive up-to-date guidance is provided regarding indications for, initiation and monitoring of immunosuppressive therapies, nutrition interventions, pre-, peri- and postoperative management, as well as structure and function of the multidisciplinary team and integration between primary and secondary care. Twenty research priorities to inform future clinical management are presented, alongside objective measurement of priority importance, determined by 2379 electronic survey responses from individuals living with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, including patients, their families and friends.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMJen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://gut.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=31562236en_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectWessex Classification Subject Headings::Gastroenterologyen_US
dc.titleBritish Society of Gastroenterology consensus guidelines on the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adultsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.journalGuten_US
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6872448
dc.description.noteThis article is freely available via Open Access. Click on the Publisher URL to access the full-text.en_US
dc.type.versionPublisheden_US


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